A Trip to the Zoo

The National Zoological Park in Washington D.C. has animals of all shapes and sizes and ethnicities.

The+King+of+the+Jungle%2C+and+of+the+Smithsonian+National+Zoo%2C+the+majestic+lion+rules+everywhere+she+goes.+Despite+being+so+naturally+feared%2C+they+are+still+in+danger.+Lions+are+preserved+in+the+zoo+and+actually+live+longer+than+when+they+are+left+in+the+wild.%0A
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A Trip to the Zoo

The King of the Jungle, and of the Smithsonian National Zoo, the majestic lion rules everywhere she goes. Despite being so naturally feared, they are still in danger. Lions are preserved in the zoo and actually live longer than when they are left in the wild.

The King of the Jungle, and of the Smithsonian National Zoo, the majestic lion rules everywhere she goes. Despite being so naturally feared, they are still in danger. Lions are preserved in the zoo and actually live longer than when they are left in the wild.

Matt Mangano

The King of the Jungle, and of the Smithsonian National Zoo, the majestic lion rules everywhere she goes. Despite being so naturally feared, they are still in danger. Lions are preserved in the zoo and actually live longer than when they are left in the wild.

Matt Mangano

Matt Mangano

The King of the Jungle, and of the Smithsonian National Zoo, the majestic lion rules everywhere she goes. Despite being so naturally feared, they are still in danger. Lions are preserved in the zoo and actually live longer than when they are left in the wild.

Matt Mangano, Features Editor

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